By 7 years ago in Linkbait

All linkbait needs a hook

Linkbait Hook
Linkbuilding has got a lot easier over the last couple of years. Gone are the days of sending out link exchange emails, begging for links, submitting articles and submitting to directories. Now all you have to do is write some linkbait and the links come rolling in from thousands of blogs.

Of course I’m exaggerating here but the game has changed massively and 99% of the webmaster population hasn’t caught on yet.

Now is the time to start figuring out what you can put on your website that is so interesting, stunning, newsworthy, original and compelling that somebody simply has to link to it. That’s where the concept of a linkbait hook comes in.

The hook is the aspect of your content that makes somebody take the big jump from being an interested reader to somebody passionate and excited enough to open up their website editor and take the time and effort to actually link to you.

Hundreds of webmasters every day write Top 10 lists in the vain hope that they might get some high quality links from hitting the Digg front page. When was the last time Engadget linked to a top 10 post? No quality blogs will link to Digg bait style posts unless you can get a unique hook.

A good examples of the hook concept would be a list of the Top 100 blogs in a specific niche, bloggers are usually proud to have made the list and will link back to it to show off to their readers or they disagree so strongly with the way the list was calculated they will link to it and explain how it could be done better.

When I published my Digg saturation list one of the reasons TechCrunch and Danny linked to it was because they thought it could be done better another way. Marketing Pilgrim linked to it because they were “flattered” to have made the list.

The first thing to do when you come up with a cool linkbait idea is to sit down and try to think like a blogger. Would you want to link to this piece of content? Why would you link to it? Unless you can come up with a great reason why a popular blogger would link to it then its a good idea to file it away for a few days until you can find a hook.

By Patrick Altoft. at 11:41AM on Wednesday, 17 Oct 2007

Patrick is the Director of Strategy at Branded3 and has spent the last 11 years working on the SEO strategies of some of the UK's largest brands. Patrick’s SEO knowledge and experience is highly regarded by many, and he’s regularly invited to speak at the world’s biggest search conferences and events. Follow Patrick Altoft on Twitter.

comments

2 Responses to “All linkbait needs a hook”

  1. Matt Jones says:

    Good advice. A Top 10 list without a hook isn’t good enough anymore. The bar is constantly being raised.

  2. Steven Snell says:

    Nice article. Your Digg saturation list was a great idea.

Leave a Reply